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Condortrekkers

Phone: +591 728 91740
Loa, 457,
Sucre
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Date added: 22.7.2010

Description

Condortrekkers is a not for profit tourism agency in Sucre, Bolivia. We lead tours throughout the Bolivian Andes surrounding Sucre. All profits support social projects within Sucre and the communities in the areas where we hike.

Volunteers are responsible for promoting the hikes, preparing for the hikes, assisting the Bolivian guides during the hikes and after tour cleanup.

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Certified review

I met Randall, the main Condortrekkers man(!), by coincidence and then I spent nearly 4 months in Sucre (2008) during the starting phases of the organisation.  So here's a bit of info you might find useful..........

The organisation - a genuine organisation that has definite and achievable goals.  Not interested in taking money from volunteers, just getting people involved in creating a sustainable system to give back to the areas it works within, on a real level.

Randall - lovely guy, has put his heart into the organisation, will always help you out and up for a laugh too!

Sucre - great place to live and cheap, enough to keep you occupied with a few bars and clubs, trekking, sports stuff etc but small enough to feel like home.  Pretty white buildings everywhere, good market, couple of veggie restaurants (I'm veggie) and an easy mix of real life and tourism.

Although my time with Condortrekkers was very early on in it's development and I know it has evolved a lot since I left...I have no reservations about recommending it as a great volunteering opportunity.  Enjoy!  :0)

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10 
by Gavin Sillitto
on September 5, 2010
I found Condortrekkers online a couple of months before my trip to the Andes, and thought it looked like a great organisation to get involved with - I wasn't disappointed! I left Sucre and CT after just over 2 months about 10 days ago.

The volunteers have a non-technical job, it just requires effort and enthusiasm. On the treks themselves there is not much more to do than carry a little extra weight (because you'll be fitter and more acclimatised than the clients fairly quickly) and help the Bolivian guide with the cooking, and of course you just make friends with the clients and make sure they have a great time.

Back in Sucre, the volunteers help promote the treks, prepare for them (shopping, chopping vegetables, cooking and laying stuff out etc) and clean up after them, as well as manning the office to keep it open sometimes (lunchtimes and weekends especially).

There are also occasional trips to the countryside to help the communities we pass through. We ask them what they want help with so that we don't buy something we think they need that just ends up going to waste, so on one of my trips out we fitted a window and helped clean up the local tourism centre.

Overall the volunteers' job at Condortrekkers isn't really that time-consuming, but it does spring things up at the last minute. It is hard to make definite plans unless you've just come back from a trek, because you can be needed at short notice to help prepare or lead a trek. Few things in Sucre do need you to plan well ahead though, and there is always a friendly bar to go to and excellent cheap food to eat. The tap water in Sucre is drinkable, which makes a nice change from many other places in South America and helps you feel at home more easily, and the town itself is one of the safest-feeling cities I've visited (including in my native UK).

I would certainly suggest trying to spend longer than 2 months with Condortrekkers, especially if you don't speak Spanish before you arrive. I felt that I was only beginning to reach my potential as a volunteer at the end of my time there, and I could have helped an awful lot more if I had been able to stay another month or two. Living costs are so low there that it wouldn't have been hard to stay either, it only costs about US$6 a day for rent and food, or double that if you like to drink lots and go to the more touristy restaurants.

Another thing to note is that no foreigners take any money from Condortrekkers. Before I arrived I had assumed Randall (the founder, but still a 'volunteer' rather than 'the boss'!) took a living wage, but instead he goes to work in a richer country for 3 months a year to pay for the other 9 months in Bolivia. Learning that made me far more confident that I was actually helping the world for a change!
10 
by Gavin Sillitto
on September 5, 2010
I found Condortrekkers online a couple of months before my trip to the Andes, and thought it looked like a great organisation to get involved with - I wasn't disappointed! I left Sucre and CT after just over 2 months about 10 days ago.

The volunteers have a non-technical job, it just requires effort and enthusiasm. On the treks themselves there is not much more to do than carry a little extra weight (because you'll be fitter and more acclimatised than the clients fairly quickly) and help the Bolivian guide with the cooking, and of course you just make friends with the clients and make sure they have a great time.

Back in Sucre, the volunteers help promote the treks, prepare for them (shopping, chopping vegetables, cooking and laying stuff out etc) and clean up after them, as well as manning the office to keep it open sometimes (lunchtimes and weekends especially).

There are also occasional trips to the countryside to help the communities we pass through. We ask them what they want help with so that we don't buy something we think they need that just ends up going to waste, so on one of my trips out we fitted a window and helped clean up the local tourism centre.

Overall the volunteers' job at Condortrekkers isn't really that time-consuming, but it does spring things up at the last minute. It is hard to make definite plans unless you've just come back from a trek, because you can be needed at short notice to help prepare or lead a trek. Few things in Sucre do need you to plan well ahead though, and there is always a friendly bar to go to and excellent cheap food to eat. The tap water in Sucre is drinkable, which makes a nice change from many other places in South America and helps you feel at home more easily, and the town itself is one of the safest-feeling cities I've visited (including in my native UK).

I would certainly suggest trying to spend longer than 2 months with Condortrekkers, especially if you don't speak Spanish before you arrive. I felt that I was only beginning to reach my potential as a volunteer at the end of my time there, and I could have helped an awful lot more if I had been able to stay another month or two. Living costs are so low there that it wouldn't have been hard to stay either, it only costs about US$6 a day for rent and food, or double that if you like to drink lots and go to the more touristy restaurants.

Another thing to note is that no foreigners take any money from Condortrekkers. Before I arrived I had assumed Randall (the founder, but still a 'volunteer' rather than 'the boss'!) took a living wage, but instead he goes to work in a richer country for 3 months a year to pay for the other 9 months in Bolivia. Learning that made me far more confident that I was actually helping the world for a change!
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